Charles Clore House in Bedford Way

Restricted and Redacted: Where now for human rights and digital information control?

Restricted and Redacted: Where now for human rights and digital information control?

Wednesday 9th November 2016

The Information Law and Policy Centre is delighted to announce that bookings are now open for its annual workshop and evening lecture by leading information and data protection lawyer, Rosemary Jay.

For both events, attendance will be free of charge thanks to the support of the IALS and our sponsor, Bloomsbury’s Communications Law journal. Registration will still be required as places are limited.

Please note that for administrative purposes you will need to book separate tickets for the afternoon and evening events if you would like to come to both events.


AFTERNOON WORKSHOP/SEMINAR 11am – 5pm (lunch and refreshments provided)

For the afternoon part of this event we have an excellent set of presentations lined up that consider information law and policy in the context of human rights.

Speakers will offer an original perspective on the way in which information and data interact with legal rights and principles relating to free expression, privacy, data protection, reputation, copyright, national security, anti-discrimination and open justice. Speakers include, among many others: Professor Ellen P. Goodman, Rutgers Law School, on freedom of information; Dr Vigjilenca Abazi, Maastricht University, on whistleblowing protection in Europe; Professor Ewan Sutherland, Wits University, on wire-tapping in the regulatory state; Dr David Rolph, University of Sydney, on the liability of search engines in defamation; and Professor Gavin Phillipson, University of Durham, on online privacy cases.

We will be considering topics such as internet intermediary liability, investigatory and surveillance powers, media regulation, freedom of information, defamation and privacy, the EU General Data Protection Regulation, and whistleblower protection. See full programme here: http://infolawcentre.blogs.sas.ac.uk/annual-workshop-and-evening-lecture/

EVENING LECTURE BY ROSEMARY JAY, HUNTON & WILLIAMS - Heads and shoulders, knees and toes (eyes and ears and mouth and nose…): the impact of the General Data Protection Regulation on use of biometrics 6pm-7.30pm (followed by reception)

The afternoon workshop will be followed by a keynote lecture to be given by Rosemary Jay, senior consultant attorney at Hunton & Williams and author of Sweet & Maxwell’s Data Protection Law & Practice.

Her lecture, 'Heads and shoulders, knees and toes (eyes and ears and mouth and nose…)', will consider the impact of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) on use of biometrics.

Biometrics are touted as one of the next big things in the connected world. Specific reference to biometrics and genetic data has been included for the first time in the General Data Protection Regulation. How does this affect existing provisions? Will the impact of the Regulation be to encourage or to restrict the development of biometric technology?

The lecture will be chaired by Professor Lorna Woods, a specialist in data protection and information law at the University of Essex.

About Rosemary Jay

Rosemary Jay is a senior consultant attorney at Hunton & Williams. She joined from Pinsent Masons LLP where she was head of the Information Law Practice. Prior to that she was the head of the Legal Office of the Data Protection Registrar (now the Information Commissioner) for 12 years. She has practiced in privacy law for nearly 30 years and is recognized as one of the top lawyers in the area of data protection in the UK, with Chambers and Partners recognizing her as a “Star Individual” in data protection in 2015. She advises on high-level privacy, data protection and confidentiality issues. Her practice covers all areas of information law. She has extensive experience advising on the UK Freedom of Information regime and also advises on interception, surveillance and monitoring under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act. Her clients include public bodies, multinationals and private organizations. She has advised non-EU states on the adoption and drafting of privacy laws. Jay is author of Sweet & Maxwell’s Data Protection Law & Practice, a contributing editor to The White Book on data protection and an editor of the Encyclopedia of Data Protection and Privacy. She has worked with the Council of Europe and the European Commission on privacy issues in Europe and the Commonwealth Secretariat in West Africa. Rosemary Jay is currently working on a new book on the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), a companion text to Data Protection Law & Practice which is due to be published later this year.

About the Information Law and Policy Centre at the IALS:

The Information Law and Policy Centre produces, promotes and facilitates research about the law and policy of information and data, and the ways in which law both restricts and enables the sharing and dissemination of different types of information. It is part of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, which was founded in 1947. It was conceived and is funded as a national academic institution, attached to the University of London, serving all universities through its national legal research library. Its function is to promote, facilitate and disseminate the results of advanced study and research in the discipline of law, for the benefit of persons and institutions in the UK and abroad.

About Communications Law (Journal of Computer, Media and Telecommunications Law):

Communications Law is a well-respected quarterly journal published by Bloomsbury Professional covering the broad spectrum of legal issues arising in the telecoms, IT and media industries. Each issue brings you 32 pages of opinion and discussion from the field of communications law. It is currently edited by Dr Paul Wragg, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Leeds.